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Posted On March 1, 2009 By In The Phish Bowl And 549 Views

Rocky Raccoon 100mi & 50mi Endurance Trail Run

Huntsville State Park, February 7, 2009 – Texas Finishers

Aftermath

BY MATT CROWNOVER

[Ed. Note: At this race, Matt PR’d the distance with a 21:22:34, an incredible effort considering he walked the last 10 miles.]

My foot began to be sore early in the Rocky Raccoon 100 Miler. There was never any moment where anything snapped or popped or anything, it just was sore. I kept changing shoes, orthotics, trying to figure it out. It was not until Mile 90 that it really crossed over into true pain. Soon thereafter, I was unable to run.

It hurt worse and worse and I was simply unable to ambulate at all. I called my mom, who appropriated one of my sister’s walkers (my sister has MS). The walker was the only way I could get in the house. The pain was bad. If anything touched the foot, even a sheet or blanket, it bled. If I put any pressure or weight on it, it was excruciating. I elected to call Dr. Alan Sherman at home on a Sunday night. It was either that or go the hospital. Sherman was super, and agreed to X-ray me early Monday morning. The irony is that I was in the best shape ever after a run.

This sounds crazy, but think about it. I had to stand on one leg to brush my teeth, bathe, shower, etc. That would be hard for me even if I had not just run a 100 miles.

At 8 a.m., I was in Sherman’s office. It was negative for fracture. But did show something odd about my cuboid bone (more on that in a second). However, if you know anything about stress fractures, you know that it can take a week or so to reveal. You don’t actually see the fracture, rather the healing process that indicates it.

We agreed that having hurt the foot early, then running all day on it, probably created an exception. The actual fracture would probably be visible. Besides, the narrative of the injury really supported injury to the peroneal tendon. The tendon appeared to have slipped out of its groove, then the cuboid bone fell down. That is what we could see on the X-ray, that the bone had fallen. Kind of a displacement/dislocation idea.

Once out, you might have a sore foot at the end of your workday. But if you keep running, you just might incur the consequence of your cuboid bone no longer being held up by said tendon. Thus my displaced bone. He said that running on uneven surfaces is a good way to do this, i.e. if I were to step on a root or rock funny.

Okay so what to do? If you know Sherman, you know he is good and very old school. I like that about him. He rather plainly declared that we would need to “manipulate” everything back into place. There was little ceremony to my presenting the foot to him.

I will say simply that I did not believe it was possible for me to hurt this bad and not pass out. It took a while to “knead” the tendon back into place. Oh, and then there was the bone pressing.

I am now in a soft cast and will be for the rest of the week. I have upgraded from walker to crutches, a major improvement. My spirits are good because this will heal quickly, and besides I planned to take February off and not train until March. I was already primed for some down time. My only real sadness is that I cannot drink alcohol with the prescribed painkillers. So, I will probably have to ditch those. In all seriousness, God does not waste anything, and this could be a good time for me to grow in compassion for my patients. Today I was really struck by how poorly my part of the hospital is designed for handicapped folk. And I office in the Rehab and Outpatient Rehab areas!

Also I feel very grateful for old school champs like Sherman who say “call me at home if you ever need to” and really mean it.

As for the run, I remain really excited about all of our efforts. We had a strong group and honestly I feel it’s the closest I’ve ever had to a team spirit. We all helped each other, and God knows we don’t do these things alone. I am proud for us, crews, pacers, families, friends. Deep gratitude. I know it sounds crazy, but I really think this is a freak thing that could have happened anywhere. In that respect, the injury really is separate from the race.

I’m not in denial: I am just choosing where to put my energy. I know it sounds nuts, but hey, I want to savor our victory and besides I was going to loaf around anyway, so now I will just heal up. Peace. MC


Veteran ultra-runner Lynn Ballard added, “I’d like to point out that “mostly walked in to the finish” worked out to a 21 hour, 22 minute 100 mile race, 28th person across the finish line of 162 finishers of 239 who were brave enough to toe the line. Matthew, I have to say that I saw more grit and determination out of you on Saturday and Sunday than I knew you possessed! Very nice work, my friend!” PAUL STONE, who was volunteering at the race with Ballard, said of Matt’s performance, “The true character of an ultra-runner comes during the ‘storm,’ not during those times of relative ease and comfort when all is good and you’re having the race of your life. Well done, my friend.”

Another supreme effort came from DANE MCGUFFEE. He placed 8th overall in an unbelievable time of 18:44:12. But the real surprise was this was his first ultra-run. “Dumb luck,” was his first response. “I didn’t know what I was doing. I felt like I had done one lap of the lake! I had no blisters or aches.” Forty-eight hours after he finished, he signed up for another 100 miler. His training consisted of only one 40 mile run and several 30’s. But felt it was the back-to-back runs, where he’d run 20 miles on Friday, 30 on Saturday, and another 20 on Sunday, that really helped. That and his experienced friend, JERRY LEWIS, who finished 25:53:51. “We’re like brothers. He’s the wind beneath my wings.”

“It becomes intuitive. The more I did, the more I wanted to do. I wouldn’t even put on my shoes if I wasn’t doing 15 miles.” He also had four 20 mile days in a row, intermixed, getting up to about 120 miles per week. Most weeks were 80-90 miles. Some day he would like to race the famed Western States 100.

Last, note the results of the 1 Mile race held in conjunction with the 100, and 50 mile races. Noah Crownover, 7, and Micah Crownover, 4, also ran over hill and dale, and brook, root, and slope, literally following in their dad’s footsteps, Matt Crownover. Both youngsters were mentioned last month for doing the Bandera Trail Run on January 10. Both improved their time by over a minute!

Rocky Racoon Results

100 MILERS, 239 start/162 finish, 68%

6          18:39:45.80 Peter Vrolijk, 50

8          18:44:12.30 Dane McGuffee, 40

17        20:07:26.95 Melanie Fryar, 28

28        21:22:34.80 Matt Crownover, 36

30        21:32:48.00 Elizabeth Howard, 37

32        21:35:13.15 Mark Richards, 35

35        22:22:57.95 Brad Quinn, 36

36        22:25:06.10 Claude Hicks, 49

37        22:35:50.45 Gary Horn, 51

38        22:37:25.70 Les Ellsworth, 54

39        22:40:04.75 Greg Carlson, 29

41        22:45:27.00 Mike Krejci, 37

42        22:52:24.60 Chad Armstrong, 40

47        23:07:16.25 Kim Pilcher, 45

48        23:11:10.55 Gina Bolton, 29

51        23:17:48.50 Jennifer Evans, 40

52        23:20:41.95 Keith Gartrell, 39

54        23:24:32.25 Richard Cullen, 33

56        23:27:52.20 John Sharp, 31

57        23:29:50.65 Ken Arble

58        23:30:12.15 Chris McConnell, 41

62        23:42:51.10 Barbara Hitzfeld, 47

63        23:42:51.70 George Hitzfeld

65        23:45:24.60 Stuart Skeeter, 38

66        23:46:05.35 Jean Perez, 45

68        23:47:29.55 Buddy Teaster, 45

70        23:55:41.30 Brett Bassham, 48

72        24:16:09.15 Timothy Allen, 40

78        24:47:04.75 Jeff Farrell, 48

80        25:01:18.00 Robert King, 47

81        25:02:31.85 Andy Ralph, 42

85        25:09:51.45 John Powers, 45

88        25:14:05.70 Niki Bellnoski, 22

98        25:53:33.35 Rene Villalobos, 50

99        25:53:51.05 Jerry Lewis, 38

100      25:53:51.65 Stephen Stanley, 56

102      25:56:54.35 George Blust, 39

103      25:57:26.25 Kent Fish, 56

105      26:08:57.70 David McGeehon, 40

110      26:31:44.75 Pat Shannon, 57

114      26:43:00.45 Jason Culverhouse, 35

116      26:48:49.15 Nofal Musfy, 66

127      27:23:44.70 Ed Brickell, 49

130      27:44:20.15 Axel Reissnecker, 55

131      27:48:12.25 John Simmons, 28

147      28:35:43.25 David Allen, 50

149      28:47:48.90 Robert Botto, 59

150      28:47:49.40 Luis Vielma, 41

155      29:04:22.00 Rebecca Gartrell, 36

157       29:07:35.95 Laurie Underwood, 48

158      29:09:31.60 Naresh Bhagavatha, 31

159      29:11:28.95 Abigail Meadows, 37

162      29:41:38:00 Eunsip Kim, 56

 

50 MILERS 197 start/173 finish, or 88%

3          6:51:35.50 Francisco Garza, 43

10        7:57:44.30 Mark S Sobus, 41

11        8:02:13.20 Meredith Terranova, 34

12        8:02:14.20 Rick Taylor, 37

14        8:11:11.55 Joe Tammaro, 45

15        8:21:22.80 Mark Crisman, 45

18        8:38:59.95 Brian Zemlicka, 47

19        8:39:06.00 Jeff Gosmano, 37

21        8:46:45.80 Jacqueline O’Brien-Nolen, 43

22        8:56:21.40 Dan Jordan, 51

24        8:58:18.45 Felix Montelongo, 32

25        9:01:13.95 Jacob Fetterolf, 20

28        9:07:19.55 Kevin Boudreaux, 34

31        9:17:48.00 John Opalko, 47

36        9:32:00.70 John Blanchard, 50

39        9:32:14.50 Andrew Readinger, 25

40        9:34:29.15 Joe Martinez, 39

41        9:34:48.40 Buddy Brown, 51

42        9:40:02.95 Jennifer Kimble, 37

43        9:42:22.55 Jesse Wilson, 33

47        9:50:41.55 Mark Smith, 37

48        9:51:33.35 Jim Kronjaeger, 50

51        10:06:37.55 Jerry Hayley, 44

55        10:24:04.85 Stephen Hudgens, 53

56        10:25:30.75 Steven Escaler, 32

57        10:25:52.00 Fred Butler, 55

59        10:27:32.00 Amanda Hayley, 20

61        10:31:33.80 Paige Krekeler, 38

62        10:31:37.10 Leslie Hale, 56

63        10:32:56.30 Clea Czysz, 36

64        10:37:41.95 Rick Strange, 49

65        10:37:52.60 Donald Rice, 35

68        10:45:59.10 Derek Purvis, 36

70        10:48:08.15 Martha Strathouse, 35

71        10:48:08.45 Jay Michals, 40

72        10:48:23.30 Jonathan Johnson, 29

75        10:54:59.70 Cathy Nevans, 43

81        11:04:43.75 Devin Brown, 34

82        11:04:43.80 David Burdette, 50

85        11:09:33.50 Stephanie Huie, 34

86        11:12:40.15 Abdel Fustok, 68

87        11:13:04.90 Dave Straub, 43

88        11:15:46.10 Brett Blankner, 35

89        11:18:20.00 Nick Papafote, 45

93        11:29:39.75 Michael Ibarra, 33

97        11:37:11.85 Dan Hamilton, 52

99        11:39:50.25 Jan Owen, 37

100      11:41:10.05 Israel Lewis, 37

102      11:52:58.15 Jon Hobson, 34

103      11:54:56.20 Lee Topham, 67

105      12:04:29.35 Julie Garcia, 36

109      12:14:31.75 Carlos Reyes, 53

110      12:15:28.85 David Painter, 52

111      12:23:50.50 Lisa Icke, 42

112      12:24:49.20 Doreen Taylor, 36

113      12:24:50.55 Bob Tyson, 57

114      12:27:57.75 Amber Logan, 34

115     12:27:58.15 Caleb Marcinkovich, 34

118      12:31:14.45 Gloria Canchola, 48

120      12:43:27.85 Lauren Kennedy, 47

121      12:48:09.20 Linda Boggs, 56

122      12:50:13.55 Joan Hilbert, 50

123      12:53:24.55 John Luna, 36

124      12:53:35.05 Brian Brode, 48

128      13:02:44.15 Murali Narasimhan, 30

130      13:04:25.10 Donna Palmer, 42

131      13:15:46.15 Cheri Woldt, 33

132      13:27:38.80 Sarah Warden, 33

133      13:29:44.35 Frank (Jim) Ingalls, 64

135      13:38:31.15 James Ficke, 47

136      13:38:31.20 Roberta Ficke, 47

137      13:39:52.80 Jon Tremont, 44

138      13:47:32.45 Ross Davison, 47

140      13:51:17.50 Derek Westbrook, 41

141      13:55:50.15 Karen Felicidario, 43

142      13:55:50.45 Peter McNamara, 49

144      14:03:46.35 Yen Nguyen, 46

147      14:05:13.20 Misty Graham-Baugh, 32

149      14:20:24.70 Deborah Sexton, 51

150      14:21:54.55 Dane Burrows, 21

151      14:21:54.75 Heather Ficke, 19

154      14:41:42.85 Sylvia Pas, 48

155      14:44:23.40 Nancy Hogan, 49

156      14:55:38.40 Jeffrey Linwood, 30

159      15:35:04.60 Alex Aldana, 41

160      15:43:19.40 Donna Whisonant, 45

161      15:44:15.60 Maryann Ramirez, 47

162      15:53:01.35 Donna Allotta, 45

163      15:53:22.30 Savitha Sridharan, 29

164      15:59:48.95 Lauren Licatino, 23

168      16:44:22.00 Carrie Knapp, 29

169      16:53:44.50 Robin Kaitschuck, 43

170      16:53:44.75 Najat Shayib, 28

 

1 MILE           10 start / 10 finish / 100%

2          8:15 Zach Smith, 11

4          9:08 Sara Krejci, 7

7          9:51 Noah Crownover, 7

8          9:53 Joe Krejci, 5

10        13:59 Micah Crownover, 4

 

 East Texas Ultra 25/50K Runs

February 14, Tyler State Park

Area results

Women:

1st overall, SHAHEEN SATTAR, 24, 2:21:28

Men:
3          Neil Smith, 37             1:57:22

4          Jeff Burrows, 37         1:59:19

5          Michael Nalehp, 52,   2:06:42

7          Jason Berend, 39         2:12:34

9          Byron Benoit, 42        2:16:58

17        Mark Norman, 51       2:34:11

26        Robert Haworth, 47   2:44:56

35        Don Rossi, 47             3:23:06

39        Kathy Norman, 35     3:44:02

Also in attendance: Sean Fleskes, Eileen Haworth, Janalou Phelan. Ken Ashby, 56, was 14th overall in the 50K with a time of 6:59:34. Matt Crownover (see 28th overall at Rocky Raccoon results) was manning the aid station at Mile 6, 12, 20, and 27.

Shaheen Sattar won overall in the female division of the 25K (15.5 miles) trail run on Saturday, boosting everyone’s confidence in her training towards April’s Boston Marathon. Today’s victory was slightly under the 4 month mark from when she was hit head-on while running, by an SUV driver who fell asleep at the wheel. This was Shaheen’s FIRST trail run. “She had an outstanding time,” said veteran endurance runner, Mark Norman, “for her first trail run on such a rough trail.” “I DEFINITELY could not have continued at that pace for another 25K,” Jeff Burrows remarked when asked about soldiering on to complete the 50K. “I’m not sure I could have continued for another 25k period! My legs were shot. They definitely earned my respect.”

Chris Phelan has written, laid out, photographed, and published The Phast Times News since 2001. He’s crisscrossed Texas on his bike three times, swam 5 miles across Lake Ray Hubbard three times, completed three Ironman triathlons, and has represented the US in completion three times, and run with the Olympic Torch. He maintained All-American status for five years and has also biked across the country, 3600 miles in 30 days. The running/triathlon coach has PR’s of 2:27 marathon, 15:40 5K, 3:55 at the Hotter ‘n Hell Hundred, and 10:00:52 Ironman. Chris is the only person to have won overall and Master’s at Dallas’ Crosson Dannis road racing series, DRC road racing series, and the USAT/SMW duathlon series. In 1988 he began Dallas’ oldest track workout, 1998 started north Texas’ first treadmill class, and 2003 he founded the world-wide Ride Of Silence. He’s been twice nominated Master’s Road Runner of the Year, highlighted in a variety of magazines and is frequently asked to speak at camps and organizations about fitness. Outside of swimming, biking, and running, Chris has summited several mountains including Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro.